Skip to main content

Homeless in Silicon Valley


Published April 5, 2013


Homeless in High Tech's Shadow

April 5, 2013

California's Silicon Valley is a microcosm of America's new extremes of wealth and poverty. Business is better than it's been in a decade, with companies like Facebook, Google and Apple minting hundreds of new tech millionaires. But not far away, the homeless are building tent cities along a creek in the city of San Jose. Homelessness rose 20 percent in the past two years, food stamp participation is at a 10-year high, and the average income for Hispanics, who make up a quarter of the area's population, fell to a new low of about $19,000 a year in a place where the average rent is $2000 a month.

As this week's Moyers & Company remembers Dr. Martin Luther King's legacy in economic justice as well as civil rights, we visit Silicon Valley to bring you this story about modern-day poverty and inequality. We talk to Cindy Chavez of Working Partnerships USA; Russell Hancock of Joint Venture Silicon Valley; Martha Mendoza, an AP writer whose recent piece about Silicon Valley poverty brought this story to our attention; Daniel Garcia, who became homeless after losing his job in a Google campus restaurant; and Teresa Frigge, a homeless woman who used to make the silicon chips that give the valley its name.

Producer/Editor: Lauren Feeney. Producer/Camera: Cameron Hickey.

Funding for Moyers & Company is provided by Carnegie Corporation of New York; The Kohlberg Foundation; Independent Production Fund, with support from the Partridge Foundation, a John and Polly Guth Charitable Fund; The Clements Foundation; Park Foundation; The Herb Alpert Foundation; The Bernard and Audre Rapoport Foundation; The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; Anne Gumowitz; The Betsy and Jesse Fink Foundation; HKH Foundation; Barbara G. Fleischman; and by our sole corporate sponsor, Mutual of America.

© 2013 Public Affairs Television, Inc. All rights reserved.
Contact Us | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy


The Dream has been Out-Sourced & American Workers are Occupied!

A worker these days checks parts of a laptop on a Hewlett Packard assembly line in Chongqing, China.
08yuan-pic-articleLarge.jpg

A worker in January 1982 checks parts of an Ampex tape recording system for USA Network in Alpine, NJ.
Monte_Barry_eng-in-charge_usa-network_1982.jpg

Tracking U.S. Manufacturing and Electronics Jobs as they disappear overseas!

In 1957, decades before Steve Jobs dreamed up Apple or Mark Zuckerberg created Facebook, a group of eight brilliant young men defected from the Shockley Semiconductor Company in order to start their own transistor business. Their leader was 29-year-old Robert Noyce, a physicist with a brilliant mind and the affability of a born salesman who would co-invent the microchip — an essential component of nearly all modern electronics today, including computers, motor vehicles, cell phones and household appliances.

I think you can credit Bob Noyce for being the first technology entrepreneur CEO, in the sense that he built a company that was wholly dedicated to being on the absolute cutting edge of technology... perpetually. The zenith of that is probably Apple Computer in the 21st century. The prototype for that is Intel in the 1960's and Seventies, where you build a company that is purely technology driven. You're not even sure what industries you're gonna be building for after a certain point. You're just driving the technology forward at breakneck pace and seeing what emerges from it all and then coping with it. It's a very, very interesting business model that never existed before and really begins with Intel.

By the time Intel introduced the microprocessor, the Santa Clara Valley bore little resemblance to the verdant farmland it had been 15 years earlier when William Shockley set up shop.

The number of high-technology jobs in the area had increased ten-fold since 1959, and the population of San Jose — the valley's largest city — had more than doubled, to nearly half a million. As consumer applications for the microprocessor began to proliferate, venture capitalists rushed in — gradually replacing the military and NASA as the financial backbone of the industry.

No longer would the area be referred to as the "Valley of Heart's Delight." After 1971 — that banner year for Intel — it would increasingly be known as "Silicon Valley" — a name soon to be synonymous with risk, technological innovation, and a new brand of the American Dream... a Dream that Bing Crosby, Ampex, the Grateful Dead, and myself were proudly part of; a Dream that provided a damned good living; a Dream that's as good as it gets... Here is my Ampex electronics story for American History.

Today, The Dream is Out-Sourced and We Are Occupied!

Apple CEO Tim Cook waves to his Chinese Slave Workers on 29 March 2012
jobs-05_tim_cook-Foxconn_iPhone_factory_29March2012.jpg
(Apple's Foxconn workers cannot wave back to Tim Cook because it slows down the production line)


watch Silicon Valley online at PBS
films_generic_thumb2.jpg



Run time 6:12
Producer Bill Moyers
Production Company MonteVideo Grafix
Audio/Visual sound, color

Reviews

There are no reviews yet. Be the first one to write a review.
DOWNLOAD OPTIONS
In Collection
Community Video
Uploaded by
Monte B Cowboy
on 4/9/2013
Views
3,491
Favorites
3
PEOPLE ALSO FOUND
Community Video
by Monte Barry
49
0
0
Community Video
by Monte Barry
957
0
0
Community Video
by Ry Cooder
6,584
1
0
Community Video
by Bill Moyers
3,487
3
0
0
Community Audio
by Kelly Pierce
65
0
0
Source: Audio-Technica AT804 omnidirectional mic > BookPort Plus digital audio recorder (auto gain control enabled)
( 4 reviews )
Ourmedia
by Terry McNerney
3,267
0
0
Community Audio
by Paul Stamets
274
2
0
Community Audio
by Kelly Pierce
112
0
0